New Free Script Fonts With Multiple Glyph Styles – Part 2

Elegant, versatile, and overly popular as script fonts are, there weren’t enough occasions for me to use them in my design work. Most of my projects required a clean-cut look and simplicity of sans-serif fonts. So as my personal side project, I came up with a script fonts’ reference file and made it a habit to keep it constantly updated. Just simply sifting through it gets me into a creative mood.

Fabulous Free Font Pairings for Special Occasions

Say hello to romantic and graceful fonts for special occasions. These elaborate yet legible font pairings bolster up unique and realistic look. The subtle imperfection of handwritten fonts combined with the classy bold sans serifs adds another new dimension to whatever project you are working on.  

Great for classy invitations, headlines, sweet sayings, bold eye-catching flyers, funny expressions, and even wayfinding signs, this pairing list is designed to spice up your event of any shape and size.


Font links: 

1. Olivia and Christian: Dhanikans  |  Julius Sans One

2. You are cordially invited: Lato Light  |  Maratre

3. Dinner Reception: Cantarell  |  Pinyon Script

4. The Annual Fundraiser: Roboto Thin  | Roboto Bold

5. Let's Pop The Bubbly: Nexa Light  |  Antrokas 

6. Performing Arts Foundation: Ants Valley Montserrat Light

7. Let’s Celebrate!: Copperplate (included with Microsoft Windows and macOS)
  |  Minnadrop

8. The Charity Ball: Shipped Goods  |  Times Bold (included with Microsoft Windows and macOS)

9. Join us for cocktails: Minnadrop  |  Marguerite

10. Grand Opening: Lato Light  |  Monsieur La Doulaise 


DISCLAIMER: Some of these fonts are for personal use only. If you need an extended or commercial license, please contact the designer or follow the instructions on the font sharing site to purchase the proper license. For more information on the fonts and their use, please read the license file included either in the font folder or on the download page. The rules of each font are subject to change at any time. It is strictly your own responsibility to make sure that the font is fully licensed for your project.

 


3 Easy Tips on How to Pair Fonts:

1. Combine fonts from very different families.


Go for a strong contrast between the typefaces. My golden rule is to choose fonts, typically up to two, that are VERY different. The the-two-fonts-are-not-quite-the-same principle doesn’t work well. Go beyond it and combine typefaces from completely different families of styles: handwritten vs industrial, serif vs sans serif, Modern vs Oldstyle, or script vs grunge. The greater the contrast the greater the power of the two fonts when combined. So, once you choose the two fonts and lay them out, take a second look and push the contrast a little further by changing the fonts’ size or tweaking the color. Contrast is contrast; it should be apparent to justify the pairing of the opposites.


2. Choose a single type family with a wide range of fonts. 



Choosing a type family with a wide variety of proportions and weights: thin, light, regular, semibold, bold, and extra bold —will give you a safe and relatively easy option to create a cohesive and clean design. A range of fonts within the family not only meet the needs of an entire body copy with headlines and sub-heads, but it also eases the uncertainty of font pairings. It may not deliver that level of sophistication and rhythm to the design job as it would when using very different fonts, but it ensures a strong typographic match through proportional and weight unity of the single font family.

3. Trust your intuition. 



Whatever you call it –– the inner voice, gut feeling, or intuition, trust it. Although it’s difficult to describe, but if it doesn’t feel right and you doubt the font choice you made, find another typeface. Intuition doesn’t negate the basic design principles but rather complements them and encourages a creative person to test out sometimes unconventional ideas, the ones that may work out in the best way possible.



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